Junk food

Factors Individuals Consume Junk Food Instead of Balanced Meals

Eating junk meals regularly is linked to obesity and chronic health conditions such as higher blood pressure, but many people still choose junk food sources over their healthy, nutritious whole meals counterparts. Junk food is actually usually inexpensive, processed and prepackaged, making it effortlessly available, but generally there tend to be several psychological motivators that predispose people on selecting it as a meal or snack.

 

Selecting Ease

Hard schedules often reduce the amount of time people have to prepare healthy, nutritious food, so that they opt for quicker, easier choices. Whole foods such as vegetables and beef take time and kitchen equipment to cook correctly, while fast food hamburgers are normally offered within minutes of purchasing. Over time, that ease becomes a practice and eventually a perceived necessity to maintain up with such a busy society. Interrupting that routine requires an investment of time, as well as most people prefer to stick with the faster alternative.

Suffering From Lack of Sleep

There is also evidence to suggest that sleep deprivation motivates people to choose junk foods over healthy foods. When sleep is restricted, the primal reward center of the brain becomes more active while executive functions of the frontal lobes become more suppressed. This effectively diminishes willpower, making people more likely to seek out foods high in fat and sugar, which are logically poor choices that trigger the reward center.

Reducing Anxiousness

A peripheral outcome of this fast-paced culture is increased amounts of stress and anxiousness. Increased stress levels trigger the body to use more energy, stimulating hunger for calorie-dense sustenance and driving people to consume fatty, sugary junk meals. High amounts of anxiousness also cause individuals to seek out junk food as a means of comfort and ease. When upset, people look for means to calm themselves, and junk food’s good consequence on the reward center of the brain make it a reassuring go-to choice.

 

Suffering From Lack of Sleep

There is also evidence to suggest that sleep deprivation motivates people to choose junk foods over healthy foods. When sleep is restricted, the primal reward center of the brain becomes more active while executive functions of the frontal lobes become more suppressed. This effectively diminishes willpower, making people more likely to seek out foods high in fat and sugar, which are logically poor choices that trigger the reward center.